Ireland, day 4 and 5; Kilmainham Gaol and Greystones.

The long road down the coast

The long road down the coast

The 4th and 5th day may be of some interest to you, adventurers and historians alike. Allow me to open: When I awoke on my thin pallet in my hostel dorm, It was a rainy.  No suprise here. I was determined to shake Dublin city-It is just damn too city there. I skipped the list of what I should have seen, including, The Croppies Acre; a memorial to all rebels who fought and died in Dublin during the Rebellion of 1798,  The National Botanic GardensThe Dublin Zoo, the famed Irish National War Memorial Gardens; a memorial to all Irish who served and died in WWI. The list of what I skipped was unfortunate but I just had to ‘git; perhaps in my thinking, I believed that the more south I venture, the better the weather but alas this is the land of eternal winter, so said the Romans. (See Hibernia)
Before I left, I visited Kilmainham Gaol, the famous jail where the rebel leaders of 1916 Rising were executed. the seven signatories of The Proclamation of the Irish Republic were taken to the stone breakers yard and shot, the last being James Connolly whose wounds were from the siege at the gpo prevented him from standing.

The Stone Breakers Yard at Kilmainham

The Stone Breakers Yard at Kilmainham

The firing squad tied him to a chair and pinned a piece of paper to his breast as a target. These men were not soldiers but teachers, musicians, and regular craftsman whose thought was for a united Ireland.  Their bodies were thrown into quicklime and denied burial.
The history of Kilmainham, stretches back to 1796 and built as a new model of jail systems. The location it was built upon was the late hangmans hill; the spot where a majority of public hangings took place in Dublin. Here are a few photos I snapped of the jail- if you are interested in Irish culture, I strongly suggest you punch it in on your searchbar.

 

I heard tell the Bus Eireann was gearing to go on strike so I muffled over to the Dart station on Pearse st. The Dart is a coastal train heading south from Dublin and it stretches down to Greystones which was my destination. Here is the Pearse station in case we have any discrepecncies! (There are many public transit stations in Dublin including, Heuston; the long distance trains and the Busáras bus station, which as I said before, went on strike.)

The Coastal Dart Train

The Coastal Dart Train

At any rate, for 5.90 Euro I managed my way to Greystone after about 40 minutes on this scenic rail. When I arrived, the evening was getting on and I was looking about for a place to stay. I walked to the farside of the beach, nestled up to some dunes and ate a dinner of baked beans and a few slices of Irish soda bread. I figured it was about time to use my tent; with much ado, as the prevailing winds gusted at 25 mph, I pitched my home for the night.


But, you may be wondering, (Maybe not) Why Greystones? Well, I’ll tell ya’- are you familiar with Ronnie Drew of the Dubliners? He was and is the figurehead and leader of the most iconic Irish folk band that ever Ireland produced! He is buried in Redford Cemetery, just on the hill of Greystones overlooking the water. I came to Ireland on his inspiration and it was by his songs and stories of a folky past that made me awe and open my eyes to this green-gilted country; Look at that beard on him, look at that grin and those shinning eyes-that my friends is a performer-one of the best balladeers to have ever graced this here earth.

As the next day was here, I explored the town a bit:

Old Anchor, Greystones

Old Anchor, Greystones

Abandoned Resort, Greystone

Abandoned Resort, Greystone

The grey stones of Greystone

The grey stones of Greystone

Sweeping Vistas, Greystones

Sweeping Vistas, Greystones

On the 5th day, nearing late afternoon, I went back to Dublin to grab a connection back south again to Waterford. From Heuston Station, Dublin the trip cost me a smacking 39 euros. I wish I would have hitched a ride instead. Here are several photos of this ancient viking town:

That’s all for now, folks!

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