Perry St. of Manhattan- An attempt at Sophisticated

I don’t like to mention the price when I’m considering food, because regardless of price food should be good and a worthwhile experience at every level of finance. Perry St Chef, and Proprietor, Cedric and Jean-Georges Vongerichten created dishes that assumed a level of excellence their presentation and flavor could not match. I’ll concede to The New York Times in their opinion that despite accolades and past success Perry St is, “…undeniably flawed and surprisingly inconsistent…”

Perry st chef and proprietor

Perry St., Chef Cedric Vongerichten, Proprietor: Jean-George Vongerichten

Lobster Butter

Poached Butter Lobster $39.00

Crispy Egg Caviar $29.00

Calamari and Yuzu Sauce

Crispy Calamari $15.00

Chilean Sea Bass

Pan Seared Black Sea Bass $34.00

Rice Cracker Crusted Tuna $19.50 Mesclun, Boston Salad add Avocado $14.00

Rice Cracker Crusted Tuna $19.50
Mesclun, Boston Salad add Avocado $14.00

 

Perry St Fried Chicken $29.00

Perry St Fried Chicken $29.00

 

 

Perry St., Meatpacking District, Manhattan, NYC

Every dish tasted just missed a beat. The best entree on the table was a toss up between the slow cooked scottish salmon and the butter poached lobster- but I cant praise them highly. I have had varying degrees of better made, more appropriately paired, and creatively presented- the best presentation goes to the crispy egg caviar dish served with vodka cream sauce.
The fried chicken I tasted from two different entrees were dry and chewy, the Scotch bonnet sauce it was served with created too much heat in the flavor and it was just down right watery.
For the fish based entrees: The Bass was tender but there was little flavor aside from overly salty and charred. The Chili Oil Roasted Hake was overcooked but the upside was that it’s sauce with fava beans and saffron made it palatable.
The desert were mostly disappointing and hardly worth mentioning; the exception was the profiteroles which were served with vanilla ice cream, peanut brittle and chocolate sauce. We also tried the Baba au rum, which was essentially a sponge cake, set on fire by rum poured on top.
It’s really a shame that our party came with such high expectations and had to leave unsettled.

The Proof of Dining Card that is used throughout the pictures is a food review business that I write for. The main focus is food for the sake of food.

See: Proof of Dining

Oahu: The Gathering Place.

Grilling and chilling is a way of life here in Hawaii; not too far removed from Oahu’s south shore (Waikiki) is a little town held in the past called Haleiwa- here you’ll find quite streets, a little more Aloha and if the seasons right, world class waves.
I had the opportunity to visit the town and dig into the local eats and catch a few stormy swells:
From whole grilled reef fish (Uhu) stuffed with Leup Chung (sweet sausage jerky) to fresh grilled pupus (snacks, appetizers), home made tattoos, all tied up neatly with a keg of Newcastle brown ale. This Hawaiian style, Superbowl shindig was steller.

A small child unafraid, digs into a grilled Uhu Fish in Wailua town, Oahu

A small child unafraid, digs into a grilled Uhu Fish in Wailua town, Oahu

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A Breakfast Burrito Farewell to Good Ol’ San Diego

I left Ocean Beach, San Diego with a heavy heart knowing that I’m leaving behind some of the tastiest socal-mex food on the planet, killer friends and great beach breaks.  I will always remember all the tasty, taco-tuesday outings, that epic thanksgiving swell (got myself on the front page, on the first issue of the new year!) and all those friendly faces from a nice little beachside hostel.

Jumping the Pier for the Swell

Though it is a sad day, I was filled with a hope for a bright future to come in the island of Oahu, Hawai’i; I was also filled by a farewell breakfast burrito from Roberto’s.

Goodbye old friend I’ll miss your melty cheese, and fried potatoes and all that tasty sausage, adios.


Roberto’s 4770 Voltaire St, San Diego, CA 92107(619) 523-1162 

Events of Foreign Sojourn, Collage

Events of Foreign Sojourn, Collage

A Breakfast Burrito Farewell to Good Ol’ San Diego

I left Ocean Beach, San Diego with a heavy heart knowing that I’m leaving behind some of the tastiest socal-mex food on the planet, killer friends and great beach breaks.  I will always remember all the tasty, taco-tuesday outings, that epic thanksgiving swell (got myself on the front page, on the first issue of the new year!) and all those friendly faces from a nice little beachside hostel.

Jumping the Pier for the Swell

Though it is a sad day, I was filled with a hope for a bright future to come in the island of Oahu, Hawai’i; I was also filled by a farewell breakfast burrito from Roberto’s.

Goodbye old friend I’ll miss your melty cheese, and fried potatoes and all that tasty sausage, adios.


Roberto’s 4770 Voltaire St, San Diego, CA 92107(619) 523-1162 

Events of Foreign Sojourn, Collage

Events of Foreign Sojourn, Collage

Cold Cuts and Hot Sandwiches: Subs, Hoagies, Grinders, Heroes

Cold Cuts and Sandwiches: Subs, Hoagies, Grinders, Heroes

The Mid-Atlantic is a fabulous place for food-specifically, the sandwich and even more specifically, those long sandwiches on a golden roll that are given so many names and equally stuffed with so many variations. Driving from New York down a coastal road through Jersey, past Delaware and into Maryland provides an amazing glimpse into some of East Coast’s most relished foodstuffs; from gas stations, to an inconspicuous deli, to a fast-food joint by the road, -you’ll find the gamut of these handful-mouthful creations. Here is a guide to some of my favorites:

The Italian Cold Cut: Prosciutto, Capicola and Genoa hams or Mortadella, thinly sliced provolone, LTO (lettuce, tomato, onion) drizzled with oil and vinegar and or slathered  with mayo, sprinkled with Italian seasoning.

Great Places to try one: Vace’s, Cleveland Park, Washington, D.C.,

Fiacco’s Italian Specialities:
260 Bleeker St. New York, NY

Wawa Gas Stations all over the Jersey turnpike (Summers are back and it’s Hoagiefest at Wawa!)

Hot Capicola

Hot Capicola from Quickchek, New Jersey

Here are some very important things to note about your quality sub, hoagie, grinder, hero:

  • bread is the most integral part of the sandwich. Don’t be afraid to ask where the bread is coming from and kudos if its baked in house.
  • Also, the heart and love of a these Italian and German influenced sandwiches are their uniqueness- don’t be put off by unusual food combos- heck, try stuffing your sub with french fries or better yet, go down to Philadelphia’s, food-historic South street, the home of the grinder and get fried mozzarella sticks loaded-up on your classic!
  • Watch the vinegar! on the Italian cold cut, an unmindful deli worker could put jarred jalapenos, pepper relish, and or chili relish on your sub (all vinegar based) AND they’ll still try to give you a sprinkle- no matter what bread or delicious meat you have inside, too much vinegar kills subs. period.
  • If you see cheap supermarket-style bologna, canned, or the prepackaged, individually sliced meat, don’t expect quality. If you see pale shredded lettuce, chances are the tomatoes don’t have much zest and neither will the onions- it’s a hunch but you can make that kind of typical sandwich at home.

Here are some of my other favorite sub-sandwich classics:

The Meatball Sub: Tangy and seasoned marinara drenching a few balls of roasted spiced meat, toasted with melted provolone and sprinkled with Italian seasoning (oregano, rosemary, parsley) Jerry’s Subs and Pizza.

The Hamburger Sub: Tender hamburger with melted cheddar, grilled onions, sauteed green peppers and cherry pepper relish piled into a toasted roll and dressed with mayonnaise. Try Tommy’s Sub Shop:
2900 N Philadelphia Ave, Ocean City, MD 2184

An Italian from Bagels on the Square, A New York Hero