Bacon Cheddar Lobster Roll (Tis’ the Season!)

A Lobster Loaf Portion with Fiddleheads and a Ramekin of Cheese Sauce

A Lobster Loaf Portion with Fiddleheads and a Ramekin of Cheese Sauce

What you will need:

  • 1 1/2 pound Lobster
  • Package of bacon
  • 250 grams of Cheddar cheese
  • 1/2 stick of butter (garlic butter works great, too)
  • 2% Milk 12-160z
  • Loaf of bread (Medium size aprox. 12inchs length, 5 inchs width.)
  • flour
  1. Preheat oven to 350 F (175 C)
  2. Put a medium size pot a little less then half-way full of water on the stove top; temp. med.-high
  3. *Place a metal mixing bowl on top of that pot so that its bottom and sides are cradled by the pot. Make sure it is large enough to contain all the ingredients; butter, cheese, milk.
  4. Place 1/2 stick of butter into the bowl
  5. Place bacon, side by side and not overlapping on an oven tray. Place in oven.
  6. Dice cheddar- doesn’t need to be perfect; toss into the metal mixing bowl, let melt.
    Cheddar, Butter, Milk on the Double Boil

    Cheddar, Butter, Milk on the Double Boil

  7. Get cracking on the lobster. Pull the bulk of the meat out from the tail, break the claws open, and check its other spindly legs for some hidden goodness- It’s possible to get quite a bit if meat if you have patience and a good hammer. (rolling pin works, too!) At the bottom of the page is a good video from Stef Le Chef on how to remove the meat.
  8. Rinse any green or guts found on the meat then dice it to chunks.
  9. Stir the blend of butter and chedder, whisking firmly, swiftly and carefuly to achieve a good consistency. Add milk slowly, we don’t want it too soupy.
  10. Sprinkle flour to thicken; Lower the heat if it seams to be sticking or bubbling. Whisk and whisk till you have achieved a nice saucy, cheesy texture. Turn heat on low.
  11. Cut the loaf in half. Dig into the bottom portion of the loaf and form a bed for all your delicious toppings to rest in. Do this to the top piece of bread too.
  12. Is your bacon burning? No? Ok well take it out when it is crispy. Pour some bacon drippings into your cheese sauce and stir it up.
  13. Layer the bacon length wise on the bottom portion of the bread loafs cozy bed.
    The Bacon and it's Drippings

    The Bacon and it’s Drippings

    Bacon is good but don’t get overzealous as we want to taste the lobster.

  14. Top the bacon with lobster chunks.
  15. Pour the golden sauce all over the bacon and lobster. If you’d like, top with some fresh parsley.
  16. Place top on and cut portions from the loaf.
    Use a bread knife and saw without pressure, equal portions.

    Use a bread knife, saw without excessive pressure into equal portions.

  17. Serve with dark greens, IE fiddleheads** as I used here, a ramekin of the rich cheese sauce. and a lemon wedge if you prefer.

*The trick to double boiling is that you don’t want the sauce to burn or become to hot, or likewise the oils to seperate due to an excess of temperature. When you double boil you are using indirect heat, like steam, to cook at a gentler rate. Also, if you have a real double boiler, use that.
**Fiddleheads are a late spring, seasonal fern coming from North America. They have a very light, acidic taste-similar to a cross between spinach and asparagus. To cook them just heat salted water to a boil and cook them for 10-15 minutes or until tender. Warning: There are many species of this fern and some are considered poisonous! So use only the judgement of experts when cultivating them from a wild source.

Here is the lobster prep video I promised:
stephane sauthier : 

Bacon Cheddar Lobster Roll (Tis’ the Season!)

A Lobster Loaf Portion with Fiddleheads and a Ramekin of Cheese Sauce

A Lobster Loaf Portion with Fiddleheads and a Ramekin of Cheese Sauce

What you will need:

  • 1 1/2 pound Lobster
  • Package of bacon
  • 250 grams of Cheddar cheese
  • 1/2 stick of butter (garlic butter works great, too)
  • 2% Milk 12-160z
  • Loaf of bread (Medium size aprox. 12inchs length, 5 inchs width.)
  • flour
  1. Preheat oven to 350 F (175 C)
  2. Put a medium size pot a little less then half-way full of water on the stove top; temp. med.-high
  3. *Place a metal mixing bowl on top of that pot so that its bottom and sides are cradled by the pot. Make sure it is large enough to contain all the ingredients; butter, cheese, milk.
  4. Place 1/2 stick of butter into the bowl
  5. Place bacon, side by side and not overlapping on an oven tray. Place in oven.
  6. Dice cheddar- doesn’t need to be perfect; toss into the metal mixing bowl, let melt.
    Cheddar, Butter, Milk on the Double Boil

    Cheddar, Butter, Milk on the Double Boil

  7. Get cracking on the lobster. Pull the bulk of the meat out from the tail, break the claws open, and check its other spindly legs for some hidden goodness- It’s possible to get quite a bit if meat if you have patience and a good hammer. (rolling pin works, too!) At the bottom of the page is a good video from Stef Le Chef on how to remove the meat.
  8. Rinse any green or guts found on the meat then dice it to chunks.
  9. Stir the blend of butter and chedder, whisking firmly, swiftly and carefuly to achieve a good consistency. Add milk slowly, we don’t want it too soupy.
  10. Sprinkle flour to thicken; Lower the heat if it seams to be sticking or bubbling. Whisk and whisk till you have achieved a nice saucy, cheesy texture. Turn heat on low.
  11. Cut the loaf in half. Dig into the bottom portion of the loaf and form a bed for all your delicious toppings to rest in. Do this to the top piece of bread too.
  12. Is your bacon burning? No? Ok well take it out when it is crispy. Pour some bacon drippings into your cheese sauce and stir it up.
  13. Layer the bacon length wise on the bottom portion of the bread loafs cozy bed.
    The Bacon and it's Drippings

    The Bacon and it’s Drippings

    Bacon is good but don’t get overzealous as we want to taste the lobster.

  14. Top the bacon with lobster chunks.
  15. Pour the golden sauce all over the bacon and lobster. If you’d like, top with some fresh parsley.
  16. Place top on and cut portions from the loaf.
    Use a bread knife and saw without pressure, equal portions.

    Use a bread knife, saw without excessive pressure into equal portions.

  17. Serve with dark greens, IE fiddleheads** as I used here, a ramekin of the rich cheese sauce. and a lemon wedge if you prefer.

*The trick to double boiling is that you don’t want the sauce to burn or become to hot, or likewise the oils to seperate due to an excess of temperature. When you double boil you are using indirect heat, like steam, to cook at a gentler rate. Also, if you have a real double boiler, use that.
**Fiddleheads are a late spring, seasonal fern coming from North America. They have a very light, acidic taste-similar to a cross between spinach and asparagus. To cook them just heat salted water to a boil and cook them for 10-15 minutes or until tender. Warning: There are many species of this fern and some are considered poisonous! So use only the judgement of experts when cultivating them from a wild source.

Here is the lobster prep video I promised:
stephane sauthier : 

A Parable: The Ugly Chicories

There was once a bundle of ugly chicories that stayed almost past their prime in the vegetable cool house. Every day a different cook on a different shift would sift through the bunches of carrots, browse the turnips and pluck a few red tomatoes from their vines but never, never would they venture to those ugly chicories.

The Ugliest Chicories!

The Ugliest Chicories!

One day, the poor chicories were in utter despair, lamenting at their brown tinge, and their unsightliness. They had exhausted  the hope that they would ever find themselves cozy in a bed of salad and dressing or garnishing a plate of grilled vegetables. Woe for those poor, ugly, ugly chicories!

On one particular shift, on one particular evening, a cook with a discerning eye came into this cool house. He checked his list to see what he may need: Browsing the turnips he snatched a few, plucking a carrot he grabbed two, looking through the red tomatoes he passed them up but the chicories, almost forgotten yet again were taken in bulk, surely, they thought, to be cast away in the garbage heap!

A whack and a wash will do them some good.

A whack and a wash will do them some good.

But to decompose in the stinking refuse was not their design for the cook with a discerning eye had something else in mind. He saw them to the core and clicked his tongue at the other cooks for their laziness and was happy to have made such a decision. First he gave them a whack at the stem with  a clean, sharp knife, then he gently gave them a wash in the colander. Sure enough, layer after layer of rot and slime did yield to a pretty yellow and white; what succulent leaves you have chicories-how sublime!

The core was beautiful as all can see

The core was beautiful as all can see

The story is complete and the chicories had been saved. They ended their days on beds of romaine and radishes, adorning beautiful plates of vegetables and meats-it goes to say that when working your day, in the heat of the kitchen and the business in your head, it pays to look twice; waste is the devil and downright grim. So in my closing tale, I venture to say, look at all with an even eye, look twice or maybe thrice and give those chicories a try.

– Joe Foley’s Foreign Sojourn
IMGP1307 IMGP1238

Old Major

I have an interesting story I’d like to share. It’s a bit of an exaggeration, though largely drawn from fact and an experience I had once upon a time. I Thought it might be worth a note here cus’ I couldn’t find a coherent reason to put it in a novel.
One day I was working in a small kitchen-only room enough for two at an elbow to elbow. In essence, the sous chef was also the dishwasher and changed jobs with a quick about-face turn. Well, we had the most important things a kitchen could need there. In the corner of the place was an upright meat spit. The one you’d find at a gyro place. To the left of that was the flat iron grill, moving left was an oven with two burners on top. In the opposite side of the meat-spit was two beverage Frigidaire with sliding glass doors. They were both converted to hold fresh produce-milk, eggs, lettuce, meat, etc.
Lets keep moving along left to get a clear picture. You stepped into the kitchen and you saw the aforementioned on the back wall. To the left of this fridge was the call window; a small little port to a bright world where tickets came in and food left. (Sometimes praise came in too but jus’ mostly curses were exchanged as far as words went.) Well than after this white and blue painted window was a table for prep. Then some shelves to hold pots, pans and spices. Knives were hung on the wall next to the prep table on the wall.
When you walked in all this  equipage was to your left and to your right was the closest wall where your wash station was. It housed a double sink, a flexible jet hose,some drying racks and storage for the plates and silverware. Underneath the sink was cleaning supplies in addition to a few 30 gallon barrels of brined olives and sesame oil. If your wondering, I worked at a Greek/Mediterranean kitchen.
The point of the story, rather the focus was upon the low ceilings and exposed pipes. We had a rat problem-and probably every other shack on that strip of University Boulevard. One day this black grizzled old major comes as fearless as the first I’ve seen him to gather some scraps from off the meat-spits drippings pan.
I the sous, but at that moment the dishwasher noticed his decent. He clambered along those dusty pipes like some sorta’ causeway down onto the lip and the backing of the stove across to the crispy grease meat. He eyed me suspiciously, as i hadn’t paused with scouring this pot, he had assumed i didn’t pay him a thought. I watched him- he climbed back up with a sizeable prize clamped in his jaws.
Like a western show-down, I wheeled around. The dishwashing hose was clutched in my hands like a pistol and I sent a jet of water up towards the pipes. It surged upwards with suprising, grease eliminating force, and knocked the Old Major hard across the stomach. He toppled off balance and fell from the low-pipe right on top of the flat iron grill like some rat burger tossed from the sky. Burger, he was not. The rat squealed and shot straight up like a firecracker. It must’ve seared the hell out of him cus’ you could hear screaming and yelping all the way back up the pipes to his hole where he came.
I looked over at the Filipino I was working with. He had a Betel nut wedged in his cheek and was whacking away at some root vegetable.
“Oh, brudda’, you sure got ‘im good.” I grinned at him and he laughed. A bit of drool came down his lower lip and he wiped it with his sleeve.
“You think he’ll come be back again?” I asked.
“I ‘tink he’ll lick his hurt, rats aint’ stupid-hungry though.”
“He’ll learn” I tried to conclude.
He chopped again and cleared the peelings into a bucket. “Next time, I trap ‘im and kill ‘im.” His knife slapped the cutting board. “Brudda, he’ll learn to be a sneak rat-that’s all.”

Image

Old Major

I have an interesting story I’d like to share. It’s a bit of an exaggeration, though largely drawn from fact and an experience I had once upon a time. I Thought it might be worth a note here cus’ I couldn’t find a coherent reason to put it in a novel.
One day I was working in a small kitchen-only room enough for two at an elbow to elbow. In essence, the sous chef was also the dishwasher and changed jobs with a quick about-face turn. Well, we had the most important things a kitchen could need there. In the corner of the place was an upright meat spit. The one you’d find at a gyro place. To the left of that was the flat iron grill, moving left was an oven with two burners on top. In the opposite side of the meat-spit was two beverage Frigidaire with sliding glass doors. They were both converted to hold fresh produce-milk, eggs, lettuce, meat, etc.
Lets keep moving along left to get a clear picture. You stepped into the kitchen and you saw the aforementioned on the back wall. To the left of this fridge was the call window; a small little port to a bright world where tickets came in and food left. (Sometimes praise came in too but jus’ mostly curses were exchanged as far as words went.) Well than after this white and blue painted window was a table for prep. Then some shelves to hold pots, pans and spices. Knives were hung on the wall next to the prep table on the wall.
When you walked in all this  equipage was to your left and to your right was the closest wall where your wash station was. It housed a double sink, a flexible jet hose,some drying racks and storage for the plates and silverware. Underneath the sink was cleaning supplies in addition to a few 30 gallon barrels of brined olives and sesame oil. If your wondering, I worked at a Greek/Mediterranean kitchen.
The point of the story, rather the focus was upon the low ceilings and exposed pipes. We had a rat problem-and probably every other shack on that strip of University Boulevard. One day this black grizzled old major comes as fearless as the first I’ve seen him to gather some scraps from off the meat-spits drippings pan.
I the sous, but at that moment the dishwasher noticed his decent. He clambered along those dusty pipes like some sorta’ causeway down onto the lip and the backing of the stove across to the crispy grease meat. He eyed me suspiciously, as i hadn’t paused with scouring this pot, he had assumed i didn’t pay him a thought. I watched him- he climbed back up with a sizeable prize clamped in his jaws.
Like a western show-down, I wheeled around. The dishwashing hose was clutched in my hands like a pistol and I sent a jet of water up towards the pipes. It surged upwards with suprising, grease eliminating force, and knocked the Old Major hard across the stomach. He toppled off balance and fell from the low-pipe right on top of the flat iron grill like some rat burger tossed from the sky. Burger, he was not. The rat squealed and shot straight up like a firecracker. It must’ve seared the hell out of him cus’ you could hear screaming and yelping all the way back up the pipes to his hole where he came.
I looked over at the Filipino I was working with. He had a Betel nut wedged in his cheek and was whacking away at some root vegetable.
“Oh, brudda’, you sure got ‘im good.” I grinned at him and he laughed. A bit of drool came down his lower lip and he wiped it with his sleeve.
“You think he’ll come be back again?” I asked.
“I ‘tink he’ll lick his hurt, rats aint’ stupid-hungry though.”
“He’ll learn” I tried to conclude.
He chopped again and cleared the peelings into a bucket. “Next time, I trap ‘im and kill ‘im.” His knife slapped the cutting board. “Brudda, he’ll learn to be a sneak rat-that’s all.”