Strawberry and Blueberry Donut Shortcakes

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Strawberry and Blueberry Donut Shortcake
6 Original Krispy Kreme donuts
1 Carton of fresh strawberries
1 small packet of blueberries
1 Can of strawberry pie filler
1 cup of Pineapple juice
1 1/2 cup whipping cream
1 1/2 packet of clear gelatine
Rum and Midori liquor plus a swirl or two of honey to taste

Here’s the theory: go about the process of making the fruit topping as you would jello but this time your adding slightly less gelatin to give it a better consistency.
While preparing the following step bring a cup of pineapple juice to just under boiling in a pot on the stove.
While that is working, empty the canned filling, a splash of pineapple juice, rum and midori plus the honey into a mixing bowl. Cut the strawberries into quarters lengthwise and set them aside with the blueberries.
Mix the gelatin into the bowl then add the hot pineapple juice, stirring all the while.
When you have evenly mixed the gelatin throughout, add the fruit and mix once more.
Set in the fridge to cool.
Take the donuts and place them on a sheet of nonstick waxpaper, giving them ample space between each other.
Here’s the next theory: you want to add the topping in two stages. One stage when the filling has less then jelly properties and the second stage when its at or just about jellied. What you’ll be doing at the first stage is filling the holes with a little evenly spread on top. In the second stage, you will be giving it height and packing on the flavor by adding the firm filling on top.
The key to all this is refrigeration!
Keep the donuts cold and the filling cold- leave nothing to room temperature.
The first stage should be at or a little over the 40 minute mark and the second stage should be at around 1 1/2 hours. But it varies! Check your dessert every 20 minutes!
Once you have both layers, set the donuts back in the fridge and let sit for several hours.
When serving: use a whisk or egg-beaters to fluff up the cream and give those beauties a healthy dollop or two.

There you have it, Strawberry and Blueberry Donut Shortcake. Serves 6.

Foreign Sojourn Recipes

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Wicked Spoon Buffet, Mirage Casino

Wicked Spoon, Mirage Casino
3708 S. Las Vegas Blvd.
(702) 698-7000

Here’s the skinny, the 411, the no-nonsense: Get yourself down to The Mirage, head upstairs to Wicked Spoon and see exactly why this buffet is consecutively ranked top pick in Vegas eats. Scroll through to get a look at the buffet first hand!
ps- Don’t stop scrollin’ till you hit the desserts- you won’t believe it…
-Foreign Sojourn

Wicked Spoon, Las Vegas
Wick Spoon at the Mirage Casino will blow your mind.


These desserts…you won’t believe your eyes…

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A Display Case Sent from an Angel


Meat your new best friend.


 

 

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Aisles of A La Carte

 

 

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Seared Atlantic Salmon

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Joe Foley’s Foreign Sojourn

Cold Cuts and Hot Sandwiches: Subs, Hoagies, Grinders, Heroes

Cold Cuts and Sandwiches: Subs, Hoagies, Grinders, Heroes

The Mid-Atlantic is a fabulous place for food-specifically, the sandwich and even more specifically, those long sandwiches on a golden roll that are given so many names and equally stuffed with so many variations. Driving from New York down a coastal road through Jersey, past Delaware and into Maryland provides an amazing glimpse into some of East Coast’s most relished foodstuffs; from gas stations, to an inconspicuous deli, to a fast-food joint by the road, -you’ll find the gamut of these handful-mouthful creations. Here is a guide to some of my favorites:

The Italian Cold Cut: Prosciutto, Capicola and Genoa hams or Mortadella, thinly sliced provolone, LTO (lettuce, tomato, onion) drizzled with oil and vinegar and or slathered  with mayo, sprinkled with Italian seasoning.

Great Places to try one: Vace’s, Cleveland Park, Washington, D.C.,

Fiacco’s Italian Specialities:
260 Bleeker St. New York, NY

Wawa Gas Stations all over the Jersey turnpike (Summers are back and it’s Hoagiefest at Wawa!)

Hot Capicola

Hot Capicola from Quickchek, New Jersey

Here are some very important things to note about your quality sub, hoagie, grinder, hero:

  • bread is the most integral part of the sandwich. Don’t be afraid to ask where the bread is coming from and kudos if its baked in house.
  • Also, the heart and love of a these Italian and German influenced sandwiches are their uniqueness- don’t be put off by unusual food combos- heck, try stuffing your sub with french fries or better yet, go down to Philadelphia’s, food-historic South street, the home of the grinder and get fried mozzarella sticks loaded-up on your classic!
  • Watch the vinegar! on the Italian cold cut, an unmindful deli worker could put jarred jalapenos, pepper relish, and or chili relish on your sub (all vinegar based) AND they’ll still try to give you a sprinkle- no matter what bread or delicious meat you have inside, too much vinegar kills subs. period.
  • If you see cheap supermarket-style bologna, canned, or the prepackaged, individually sliced meat, don’t expect quality. If you see pale shredded lettuce, chances are the tomatoes don’t have much zest and neither will the onions- it’s a hunch but you can make that kind of typical sandwich at home.

Here are some of my other favorite sub-sandwich classics:

The Meatball Sub: Tangy and seasoned marinara drenching a few balls of roasted spiced meat, toasted with melted provolone and sprinkled with Italian seasoning (oregano, rosemary, parsley) Jerry’s Subs and Pizza.

The Hamburger Sub: Tender hamburger with melted cheddar, grilled onions, sauteed green peppers and cherry pepper relish piled into a toasted roll and dressed with mayonnaise. Try Tommy’s Sub Shop:
2900 N Philadelphia Ave, Ocean City, MD 2184

An Italian from Bagels on the Square, A New York Hero

Cold Cuts and Hot Sandwiches: Subs, Hoagies, Grinders, Heroes

Cold Cuts and Sandwiches: Subs, Hoagies, Grinders, Heroes

The Mid-Atlantic is a fabulous place for food-specifically, the sandwich and even more specifically, those long sandwiches on a golden roll that are given so many names and equally stuffed with so many variations. Driving from New York down a coastal road through Jersey, past Delaware and into Maryland provides an amazing glimpse into some of East Coast’s most relished foodstuffs; from gas stations, to an inconspicuous deli, to a fast-food joint by the road, -you’ll find the gamut of these handful-mouthful creations. Here is a guide to some of my favorites:

The Italian Cold Cut: Prosciutto, Capicola and Genoa hams or Mortadella, thinly sliced provolone, LTO (lettuce, tomato, onion) drizzled with oil and vinegar and or slathered  with mayo, sprinkled with Italian seasoning.

Great Places to try one: Vace’s, Cleveland Park, Washington, D.C.,

Fiacco’s Italian Specialities:
260 Bleeker St. New York, NY

Wawa Gas Stations all over the Jersey turnpike (Summers are back and it’s Hoagiefest at Wawa!)

Hot Capicola

Hot Capicola from Quickchek, New Jersey

Here are some very important things to note about your quality sub, hoagie, grinder, hero:

  • bread is the most integral part of the sandwich. Don’t be afraid to ask where the bread is coming from and kudos if its baked in house.
  • Also, the heart and love of a these Italian and German influenced sandwiches are their uniqueness- don’t be put off by unusual food combos- heck, try stuffing your sub with french fries or better yet, go down to Philadelphia’s, food-historic South street, the home of the grinder and get fried mozzarella sticks loaded-up on your classic!
  • Watch the vinegar! on the Italian cold cut, an unmindful deli worker could put jarred jalapenos, pepper relish, and or chili relish on your sub (all vinegar based) AND they’ll still try to give you a sprinkle- no matter what bread or delicious meat you have inside, too much vinegar kills subs. period.
  • If you see cheap supermarket-style bologna, canned, or the prepackaged, individually sliced meat, don’t expect quality. If you see pale shredded lettuce, chances are the tomatoes don’t have much zest and neither will the onions- it’s a hunch but you can make that kind of typical sandwich at home.

Here are some of my other favorite sub-sandwich classics:

The Meatball Sub: Tangy and seasoned marinara drenching a few balls of roasted spiced meat, toasted with melted provolone and sprinkled with Italian seasoning (oregano, rosemary, parsley) Jerry’s Subs and Pizza.

The Hamburger Sub: Tender hamburger with melted cheddar, grilled onions, sauteed green peppers and cherry pepper relish piled into a toasted roll and dressed with mayonnaise. Try Tommy’s Sub Shop:
2900 N Philadelphia Ave, Ocean City, MD 2184

An Italian from Bagels on the Square, A New York Hero

The Count of Monte Cristo, A Fried Sandwich and Hashish

The Monte Cristo, a fried and golden thing; glorious is its taste, this egg battered ham sandwich, this melty Gruyère cheese christened and jam preserve garnished trifle; tis’ savoury and sweet with richness that only by counting its calories can tell …Ah, bliss be the ambrosia sent from gleaming rays into our crackling frying pans!
Pardieu!
I was carried away- right into the kitchen again! Let me put down the whisk and the egg, place the ham hock back in the fridge and start afresh. (Though, I shall be returning to this sandwich in a later post!)
The Count of Monte Cristo, first published in 1844, by the author, Alexandre Dumas, a man-made famous for his daring and politics but also by the creation of the d’Artagnan romance novels, (Three Musketeers being the first) is a tail of tragedy and betrayal that turns into a plundering, romp of riches, extravagance and harrowing acts of honor and valour.
As I am not finished with this tomb of over 800 exciting pages, I cannot concluded a synopsis. Instead of this, I will give to you some exciting excerpts and quotes I’ve dredged up from these daring depths: Dumas supposed feelings and advocacies of the illicit recreational drug hashish, synthesized marijuana.
(Dumas, Alexandre. The Count of Monte Cristo. Ware [England: Wordsworth Editions, 1997. Print.)

p.226 as spoken by the Count of Monte Cristo disguised under the appellation, Sinbad the Sailor:

“…-judge but do not confine yourself to one trial. Like everything else, we must habituate the sense to a fresh impression, gentle or violent, sad or joyous.”

“There is a struggle in nature against this divine substance- in nature which is not made for joy and clings to pain. Nature subdued must yield in the combat, this dream must succeed to reality, and then the dream reigns supreme, then the dream becomes life, and life becomes the dream. But what changes occur! It is only by comparing the pains of actual being with the joys of the assumed existence, that you would desire to live no longer, but to dream thus forever. When you return to this mundane sphere from your visionary world, you would seem to leave a Neapolitan spring for a Lapland winter- to quit paradise for Earth- heaven for hell! Taste the hashish guest of mine- taste the hashish.”

“A grateful world to the dealer in happiness”

The Count of Monte Cristo

The Count of Monte Cristo

Part 2 to come! Till next time and adieu!

Greek Pasticcio: Made in Athens

I had chance to stop over in Athens on the way to Dublin. A beautiful friend of mine hosted me for a few days. The weather was fine and we ate well thanks to her mama! I jotted a few notes down in the kitchen while I was there and I have for you, dear readers and friends alike, an authentic Greek recipe for Pasticcio. (which is, loosely, a bake of meat, noodles, veggies and cream.)

Salted Tomato Wedges and Plated Pasticcio.

Salted Tomato Wedges and Plated Pasticcio.

What you need:
cinnamon, fennel, salt, pepper, cummin, parsley
butter, flour, 2 eggs olive oil, whole milk,
can of diced tomatoes,
one large red onion,
1/2 Kilo of ground beef,
A package of Macaroni noodles
2 glass, medium sized baking dishes

Prep:

  • Bring a pot of lightly salted water to boil and add whole package of Macaroni
  • Dice red onion
  • Chop fennel and Parsley
  • preheat oven to 250C

Cooking:

  • Heat pan with 5 spoons of olive oil on medium high heat.
  • Add diced red onions when the pan and oil is to temperature.
  • After 5 minutes add parsley, fennel and beef. Stir.
  • Add can of diced tomatoes with 2 cans of water. Stir.
  • Mix in 1tsp Cinnamon, dash salt, sprinkle of pepper.
  • Cover and allow to cook for another 10-15 minutes, checking so that the water is about removed

IMGP1439IMGP1440

  • If Macaroni is finished, strain, rinse and put to the side.
  • Turn heat off on pan and allow to sit on burner to remove any more water.
  • Now, make a bechamel:
  • crack and beat 2 eggs in a seperate bowl
  • add 100 grams of butter to a medium sized sauce pot on the stove.
  • add 3-4 cups of whole milk
  • Add 1 cup of flour
  • beat it to a smooth pourable consistency over low heat.
  • Slowly add eggs, a pinch of salt and a 1tsp of cumin. beat and mix.

Making the BechemalIMGP1453

  • Grease the two glass baking dishes with olive oil

Grease the Pan, Luke.

  • place macaroni in both as a bottom layer being sure to leave half of the mac. for the top layer.

IMGP1467

  • taking the pan, add the meat and veggies ontop of the bottom noodle layer.

IMGP1469

  • Add a top layer of noodles
  • Coat that soon to be pasticcio with your bechemal

IMGP1470

  • Place it in the preheated oven in the middle rack for aprox 40 minutes.
  • Allow to cool for 20 minutes when finished.

Yassas!

Greek Pasticcio: Made in Athens

I had chance to stop over in Athens on the way to Dublin. A beautiful friend of mine hosted me for a few days. The weather was fine and we ate well thanks to her mama! I jotted a few notes down in the kitchen while I was there and I have for you, dear readers and friends alike, an authentic Greek recipe for Pasticcio. (which is, loosely, a bake of meat, noodles, veggies and cream.)

Salted Tomato Wedges and Plated Pasticcio.

Salted Tomato Wedges and Plated Pasticcio.

What you need:
cinnamon, fennel, salt, pepper, cummin, parsley
butter, flour, 2 eggs olive oil, whole milk,
can of diced tomatoes,
one large red onion,
1/2 Kilo of ground beef,
A package of Macaroni noodles
2 glass, medium sized baking dishes

Prep:

  • Bring a pot of lightly salted water to boil and add whole package of Macaroni
  • Dice red onion
  • Chop fennel and Parsley
  • preheat oven to 250C

Cooking:

  • Heat pan with 5 spoons of olive oil on medium high heat.
  • Add diced red onions when the pan and oil is to temperature.
  • After 5 minutes add parsley, fennel and beef. Stir.
  • Add can of diced tomatoes with 2 cans of water. Stir.
  • Mix in 1tsp Cinnamon, dash salt, sprinkle of pepper.
  • Cover and allow to cook for another 10-15 minutes, checking so that the water is about removed

IMGP1439IMGP1440

  • If Macaroni is finished, strain, rinse and put to the side.
  • Turn heat off on pan and allow to sit on burner to remove any more water.
  • Now, make a bechamel:
  • crack and beat 2 eggs in a seperate bowl
  • add 100 grams of butter to a medium sized sauce pot on the stove.
  • add 3-4 cups of whole milk
  • Add 1 cup of flour
  • beat it to a smooth pourable consistency over low heat.
  • Slowly add eggs, a pinch of salt and a 1tsp of cumin. beat and mix.

Making the BechemalIMGP1453

  • Grease the two glass baking dishes with olive oil

Grease the Pan, Luke.

  • place macaroni in both as a bottom layer being sure to leave half of the mac. for the top layer.

IMGP1467

  • taking the pan, add the meat and veggies ontop of the bottom noodle layer.

IMGP1469

  • Add a top layer of noodles
  • Coat that soon to be pasticcio with your bechemal

IMGP1470

  • Place it in the preheated oven in the middle rack for aprox 40 minutes.
  • Allow to cool for 20 minutes when finished.

Yassas!