Perry St. of Manhattan- An attempt at Sophisticated

I don’t like to mention the price when I’m considering food, because regardless of price food should be good and a worthwhile experience at every level of finance. Perry St Chef, and Proprietor, Cedric and Jean-Georges Vongerichten created dishes that assumed a level of excellence their presentation and flavor could not match. I’ll concede to The New York Times in their opinion that despite accolades and past success Perry St is, “…undeniably flawed and surprisingly inconsistent…”

Perry st chef and proprietor

Perry St., Chef Cedric Vongerichten, Proprietor: Jean-George Vongerichten

Lobster Butter

Poached Butter Lobster $39.00

Crispy Egg Caviar $29.00

Calamari and Yuzu Sauce

Crispy Calamari $15.00

Chilean Sea Bass

Pan Seared Black Sea Bass $34.00

Rice Cracker Crusted Tuna $19.50 Mesclun, Boston Salad add Avocado $14.00

Rice Cracker Crusted Tuna $19.50
Mesclun, Boston Salad add Avocado $14.00

 

Perry St Fried Chicken $29.00

Perry St Fried Chicken $29.00

 

 

Perry St., Meatpacking District, Manhattan, NYC

Every dish tasted just missed a beat. The best entree on the table was a toss up between the slow cooked scottish salmon and the butter poached lobster- but I cant praise them highly. I have had varying degrees of better made, more appropriately paired, and creatively presented- the best presentation goes to the crispy egg caviar dish served with vodka cream sauce.
The fried chicken I tasted from two different entrees were dry and chewy, the Scotch bonnet sauce it was served with created too much heat in the flavor and it was just down right watery.
For the fish based entrees: The Bass was tender but there was little flavor aside from overly salty and charred. The Chili Oil Roasted Hake was overcooked but the upside was that it’s sauce with fava beans and saffron made it palatable.
The desert were mostly disappointing and hardly worth mentioning; the exception was the profiteroles which were served with vanilla ice cream, peanut brittle and chocolate sauce. We also tried the Baba au rum, which was essentially a sponge cake, set on fire by rum poured on top.
It’s really a shame that our party came with such high expectations and had to leave unsettled.

The Proof of Dining Card that is used throughout the pictures is a food review business that I write for. The main focus is food for the sake of food.

See: Proof of Dining

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Rain and Fog- A Haunting Nova Scotia

Nova Scotia, the maritimes: A place of history and of wilderness

 

Bacon Cheddar Lobster Roll (Tis’ the Season!)

A Lobster Loaf Portion with Fiddleheads and a Ramekin of Cheese Sauce

A Lobster Loaf Portion with Fiddleheads and a Ramekin of Cheese Sauce

What you will need:

  • 1 1/2 pound Lobster
  • Package of bacon
  • 250 grams of Cheddar cheese
  • 1/2 stick of butter (garlic butter works great, too)
  • 2% Milk 12-160z
  • Loaf of bread (Medium size aprox. 12inchs length, 5 inchs width.)
  • flour
  1. Preheat oven to 350 F (175 C)
  2. Put a medium size pot a little less then half-way full of water on the stove top; temp. med.-high
  3. *Place a metal mixing bowl on top of that pot so that its bottom and sides are cradled by the pot. Make sure it is large enough to contain all the ingredients; butter, cheese, milk.
  4. Place 1/2 stick of butter into the bowl
  5. Place bacon, side by side and not overlapping on an oven tray. Place in oven.
  6. Dice cheddar- doesn’t need to be perfect; toss into the metal mixing bowl, let melt.
    Cheddar, Butter, Milk on the Double Boil

    Cheddar, Butter, Milk on the Double Boil

  7. Get cracking on the lobster. Pull the bulk of the meat out from the tail, break the claws open, and check its other spindly legs for some hidden goodness- It’s possible to get quite a bit if meat if you have patience and a good hammer. (rolling pin works, too!) At the bottom of the page is a good video from Stef Le Chef on how to remove the meat.
  8. Rinse any green or guts found on the meat then dice it to chunks.
  9. Stir the blend of butter and chedder, whisking firmly, swiftly and carefuly to achieve a good consistency. Add milk slowly, we don’t want it too soupy.
  10. Sprinkle flour to thicken; Lower the heat if it seams to be sticking or bubbling. Whisk and whisk till you have achieved a nice saucy, cheesy texture. Turn heat on low.
  11. Cut the loaf in half. Dig into the bottom portion of the loaf and form a bed for all your delicious toppings to rest in. Do this to the top piece of bread too.
  12. Is your bacon burning? No? Ok well take it out when it is crispy. Pour some bacon drippings into your cheese sauce and stir it up.
  13. Layer the bacon length wise on the bottom portion of the bread loafs cozy bed.
    The Bacon and it's Drippings

    The Bacon and it’s Drippings

    Bacon is good but don’t get overzealous as we want to taste the lobster.

  14. Top the bacon with lobster chunks.
  15. Pour the golden sauce all over the bacon and lobster. If you’d like, top with some fresh parsley.
  16. Place top on and cut portions from the loaf.
    Use a bread knife and saw without pressure, equal portions.

    Use a bread knife, saw without excessive pressure into equal portions.

  17. Serve with dark greens, IE fiddleheads** as I used here, a ramekin of the rich cheese sauce. and a lemon wedge if you prefer.

*The trick to double boiling is that you don’t want the sauce to burn or become to hot, or likewise the oils to seperate due to an excess of temperature. When you double boil you are using indirect heat, like steam, to cook at a gentler rate. Also, if you have a real double boiler, use that.
**Fiddleheads are a late spring, seasonal fern coming from North America. They have a very light, acidic taste-similar to a cross between spinach and asparagus. To cook them just heat salted water to a boil and cook them for 10-15 minutes or until tender. Warning: There are many species of this fern and some are considered poisonous! So use only the judgement of experts when cultivating them from a wild source.

Here is the lobster prep video I promised:
stephane sauthier : 

Bacon Cheddar Lobster Roll (Tis’ the Season!)

A Lobster Loaf Portion with Fiddleheads and a Ramekin of Cheese Sauce

A Lobster Loaf Portion with Fiddleheads and a Ramekin of Cheese Sauce

What you will need:

  • 1 1/2 pound Lobster
  • Package of bacon
  • 250 grams of Cheddar cheese
  • 1/2 stick of butter (garlic butter works great, too)
  • 2% Milk 12-160z
  • Loaf of bread (Medium size aprox. 12inchs length, 5 inchs width.)
  • flour
  1. Preheat oven to 350 F (175 C)
  2. Put a medium size pot a little less then half-way full of water on the stove top; temp. med.-high
  3. *Place a metal mixing bowl on top of that pot so that its bottom and sides are cradled by the pot. Make sure it is large enough to contain all the ingredients; butter, cheese, milk.
  4. Place 1/2 stick of butter into the bowl
  5. Place bacon, side by side and not overlapping on an oven tray. Place in oven.
  6. Dice cheddar- doesn’t need to be perfect; toss into the metal mixing bowl, let melt.
    Cheddar, Butter, Milk on the Double Boil

    Cheddar, Butter, Milk on the Double Boil

  7. Get cracking on the lobster. Pull the bulk of the meat out from the tail, break the claws open, and check its other spindly legs for some hidden goodness- It’s possible to get quite a bit if meat if you have patience and a good hammer. (rolling pin works, too!) At the bottom of the page is a good video from Stef Le Chef on how to remove the meat.
  8. Rinse any green or guts found on the meat then dice it to chunks.
  9. Stir the blend of butter and chedder, whisking firmly, swiftly and carefuly to achieve a good consistency. Add milk slowly, we don’t want it too soupy.
  10. Sprinkle flour to thicken; Lower the heat if it seams to be sticking or bubbling. Whisk and whisk till you have achieved a nice saucy, cheesy texture. Turn heat on low.
  11. Cut the loaf in half. Dig into the bottom portion of the loaf and form a bed for all your delicious toppings to rest in. Do this to the top piece of bread too.
  12. Is your bacon burning? No? Ok well take it out when it is crispy. Pour some bacon drippings into your cheese sauce and stir it up.
  13. Layer the bacon length wise on the bottom portion of the bread loafs cozy bed.
    The Bacon and it's Drippings

    The Bacon and it’s Drippings

    Bacon is good but don’t get overzealous as we want to taste the lobster.

  14. Top the bacon with lobster chunks.
  15. Pour the golden sauce all over the bacon and lobster. If you’d like, top with some fresh parsley.
  16. Place top on and cut portions from the loaf.
    Use a bread knife and saw without pressure, equal portions.

    Use a bread knife, saw without excessive pressure into equal portions.

  17. Serve with dark greens, IE fiddleheads** as I used here, a ramekin of the rich cheese sauce. and a lemon wedge if you prefer.

*The trick to double boiling is that you don’t want the sauce to burn or become to hot, or likewise the oils to seperate due to an excess of temperature. When you double boil you are using indirect heat, like steam, to cook at a gentler rate. Also, if you have a real double boiler, use that.
**Fiddleheads are a late spring, seasonal fern coming from North America. They have a very light, acidic taste-similar to a cross between spinach and asparagus. To cook them just heat salted water to a boil and cook them for 10-15 minutes or until tender. Warning: There are many species of this fern and some are considered poisonous! So use only the judgement of experts when cultivating them from a wild source.

Here is the lobster prep video I promised:
stephane sauthier : 

Maritime Supermarket Adventure and A Lobster Breakfast

I checked into a hostel when I arrived in Halifax, grabbed some gravy, cheese curd french fries proudly known as putine here in Canada, sunk a 14oz of Alexander Keith’s IPA and hit the  sack. (I’ll have to dedicate a seperate post dedicated to the IPA beer and the Putine fries.) With a belly full of grease and a head full of Canadian adventures to come, I slept like a stone.
When I awoke in the morning I knew that it was time to explore the supermarket for some breakfast. On the way, I ran into the man of Halifax himself, the founder, Edward Cornwallis in all his bronze splendor:

Strapping!

Strapping!

The foreigness of the Nova Scotian supermarket was not too alarming, save these sacks of milk…!

plastic sacks of milk!

Egad, plastic sacks of milk!

I didn’t puzzle long over these milk pouches and moved on but there I was, again faced by another strange thing- what on earth are these?


They are Fiddleheads and come frome the Fiddlehead Fern. I have never come across this vegetable before as a legitimate source of food in my travels, meaning I have seen fiddleheads grow but had no idea that they are cultivated for a food source. I snatched up a quarter pound of em’ and decided to serve them with…well what do I serve them with, I puzzled anew?
I looked across the market and found my immediate answer. I followed where my eyes had locked; they found some target that registered like an inspirational lightening bolt; it was none other than those famous red skeletal crustaceans bouncing about in a 50 gallon tank by an iced display of Cod and Mullet that captured by imagination. I didn’t wait for an attendant. I plunged my hand into the tub and plucked that 2 pounder in the front and said to the man in the white apron, can you steam this for me? He was startled but agreed with a nod.

A Crock of Maritime Gold.

A Crock of Maritime Gold.

I reckon you are paying attention but I’ll elaborate: You will be hard pressed to find better prices anywhere in the world. (Unless you talk to a fisherman or dive for em’ off the bay yourself!)
Here is the menu I created for my breakfast sup: Bacon Lobster Loaf with cheddar, garlic butter sauce and a side of boiled and lightly salted Fiddleheads. Lets take a look at the prep and the cooking on part 2(soon to come.) Slice of Lobster Loaf