One more for Raglan Public House- Thanksgiving Sando

The special of the month is the Thanksgiving Sando-
A sandwich of toasted, buttery sourdough with melty-Brie smashed between spiced meaty stuffing, thick cuts of roasted and juicy turkey, finished with that tangy sweet homemade cranberry relish; it hits and hits and hits! This stuff is what the season is about and I am stoked to see the local spot has caught on too.
Wait a second, did I mention the savory dipping gravy that comes with?- I have a suspicion they’re using a tasty secret ingredient which I’ll divulge- beer! That is some good dipping gravy, friends.
Comes with hand-cut potato chips and a few crinkle-cut pickle chips that you can slap on for an extra zing.

Look at that sando!

Look at that sando!

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One more for Raglan Public House- Thanksgiving Sando

The special of the month is the Thanksgiving Sando-
A sandwich of toasted, buttery sourdough with melty-Brie smashed between spiced meaty stuffing, thick cuts of roasted and juicy turkey, finished with that tangy sweet homemade cranberry relish; it hits and hits and hits! This stuff is what the season is about and I am stoked to see the local spot has caught on too.
Wait a second, did I mention the savory dipping gravy that comes with?- I have a suspicion they’re using a tasty secret ingredient which I’ll divulge- beer! That is some good dipping gravy, friends.
Comes with hand-cut potato chips and a few crinkle-cut pickle chips that you can slap on for an extra zing.

Look at that sando!

Look at that sando!

Cold Cuts and Hot Sandwiches: Subs, Hoagies, Grinders, Heroes

Cold Cuts and Sandwiches: Subs, Hoagies, Grinders, Heroes

The Mid-Atlantic is a fabulous place for food-specifically, the sandwich and even more specifically, those long sandwiches on a golden roll that are given so many names and equally stuffed with so many variations. Driving from New York down a coastal road through Jersey, past Delaware and into Maryland provides an amazing glimpse into some of East Coast’s most relished foodstuffs; from gas stations, to an inconspicuous deli, to a fast-food joint by the road, -you’ll find the gamut of these handful-mouthful creations. Here is a guide to some of my favorites:

The Italian Cold Cut: Prosciutto, Capicola and Genoa hams or Mortadella, thinly sliced provolone, LTO (lettuce, tomato, onion) drizzled with oil and vinegar and or slathered  with mayo, sprinkled with Italian seasoning.

Great Places to try one: Vace’s, Cleveland Park, Washington, D.C.,

Fiacco’s Italian Specialities:
260 Bleeker St. New York, NY

Wawa Gas Stations all over the Jersey turnpike (Summers are back and it’s Hoagiefest at Wawa!)

Hot Capicola

Hot Capicola from Quickchek, New Jersey

Here are some very important things to note about your quality sub, hoagie, grinder, hero:

  • bread is the most integral part of the sandwich. Don’t be afraid to ask where the bread is coming from and kudos if its baked in house.
  • Also, the heart and love of a these Italian and German influenced sandwiches are their uniqueness- don’t be put off by unusual food combos- heck, try stuffing your sub with french fries or better yet, go down to Philadelphia’s, food-historic South street, the home of the grinder and get fried mozzarella sticks loaded-up on your classic!
  • Watch the vinegar! on the Italian cold cut, an unmindful deli worker could put jarred jalapenos, pepper relish, and or chili relish on your sub (all vinegar based) AND they’ll still try to give you a sprinkle- no matter what bread or delicious meat you have inside, too much vinegar kills subs. period.
  • If you see cheap supermarket-style bologna, canned, or the prepackaged, individually sliced meat, don’t expect quality. If you see pale shredded lettuce, chances are the tomatoes don’t have much zest and neither will the onions- it’s a hunch but you can make that kind of typical sandwich at home.

Here are some of my other favorite sub-sandwich classics:

The Meatball Sub: Tangy and seasoned marinara drenching a few balls of roasted spiced meat, toasted with melted provolone and sprinkled with Italian seasoning (oregano, rosemary, parsley) Jerry’s Subs and Pizza.

The Hamburger Sub: Tender hamburger with melted cheddar, grilled onions, sauteed green peppers and cherry pepper relish piled into a toasted roll and dressed with mayonnaise. Try Tommy’s Sub Shop:
2900 N Philadelphia Ave, Ocean City, MD 2184

An Italian from Bagels on the Square, A New York Hero

Cold Cuts and Hot Sandwiches: Subs, Hoagies, Grinders, Heroes

Cold Cuts and Sandwiches: Subs, Hoagies, Grinders, Heroes

The Mid-Atlantic is a fabulous place for food-specifically, the sandwich and even more specifically, those long sandwiches on a golden roll that are given so many names and equally stuffed with so many variations. Driving from New York down a coastal road through Jersey, past Delaware and into Maryland provides an amazing glimpse into some of East Coast’s most relished foodstuffs; from gas stations, to an inconspicuous deli, to a fast-food joint by the road, -you’ll find the gamut of these handful-mouthful creations. Here is a guide to some of my favorites:

The Italian Cold Cut: Prosciutto, Capicola and Genoa hams or Mortadella, thinly sliced provolone, LTO (lettuce, tomato, onion) drizzled with oil and vinegar and or slathered  with mayo, sprinkled with Italian seasoning.

Great Places to try one: Vace’s, Cleveland Park, Washington, D.C.,

Fiacco’s Italian Specialities:
260 Bleeker St. New York, NY

Wawa Gas Stations all over the Jersey turnpike (Summers are back and it’s Hoagiefest at Wawa!)

Hot Capicola

Hot Capicola from Quickchek, New Jersey

Here are some very important things to note about your quality sub, hoagie, grinder, hero:

  • bread is the most integral part of the sandwich. Don’t be afraid to ask where the bread is coming from and kudos if its baked in house.
  • Also, the heart and love of a these Italian and German influenced sandwiches are their uniqueness- don’t be put off by unusual food combos- heck, try stuffing your sub with french fries or better yet, go down to Philadelphia’s, food-historic South street, the home of the grinder and get fried mozzarella sticks loaded-up on your classic!
  • Watch the vinegar! on the Italian cold cut, an unmindful deli worker could put jarred jalapenos, pepper relish, and or chili relish on your sub (all vinegar based) AND they’ll still try to give you a sprinkle- no matter what bread or delicious meat you have inside, too much vinegar kills subs. period.
  • If you see cheap supermarket-style bologna, canned, or the prepackaged, individually sliced meat, don’t expect quality. If you see pale shredded lettuce, chances are the tomatoes don’t have much zest and neither will the onions- it’s a hunch but you can make that kind of typical sandwich at home.

Here are some of my other favorite sub-sandwich classics:

The Meatball Sub: Tangy and seasoned marinara drenching a few balls of roasted spiced meat, toasted with melted provolone and sprinkled with Italian seasoning (oregano, rosemary, parsley) Jerry’s Subs and Pizza.

The Hamburger Sub: Tender hamburger with melted cheddar, grilled onions, sauteed green peppers and cherry pepper relish piled into a toasted roll and dressed with mayonnaise. Try Tommy’s Sub Shop:
2900 N Philadelphia Ave, Ocean City, MD 2184

An Italian from Bagels on the Square, A New York Hero

A Monte Cristo served with Candied Figs

I’ve been reading a classic and it inspired me to create this sandwich-The Monte Cristo. Can you guess the title of the book?
Well, this hybrid croque-monsieur, (also known as the grilled cheese with ham) calls for butter-frying the white bread in an egg batter, similar to french toast; it is a decadent treat that pairs salty, savory with sweet. It is joined with jam or preserves and sometimes sprinkled with a bit of powdered sugar! I opted for a candied fig garnish and no powdered sugar. If you love hot, satisfying sandwiches, this ones for you!

Voilà, a Monte Cristo

Voilà, a Monte Cristo


This recipe makes 3 sandwiches, adjust as needed.

For the sandwich:

  • 6 Slices of White Bread
  • 1/4 pound of roasted turkey, thin slices
  • 1/4 pound Honey Ham or Regular Ham, thin slices Slices
  • A wedge of Gruyère cheese

For the candied fig side garnish:

  • 4 figs
  • Several tablespoons of sugar
  • Triple Sec or orange juice

Batter:

  • 2-3 whole eggs

Preparation:

  • Preheat oven to 300 Farenheit or 150 Celsius
  • Gently cut figs into small wedges
  • Crack eggs into bowl and whisk to a blended consistency
  • Make the sandwich: Ham, Turkey and slices of cheese; Set aside next to batter.

Making the Candied Figs:

  • put several large tablespoons of sugar into a pan add a few splashes of water then set on stove top on medium temperature.
  • Caramelize the sugar.

    Sugar to Caramel

    Sugar to Caramel

  • Add figs and stir them around to get them evenly coated.
  • Add a few splashes of triple sec and reduce heat to low-medium heat.

    Caramelizing the Figs, Adding the Triple Sec

    Caramelizing the Figs, Adding the Triple Sec

  • Allow to reduce and thicken for a few minutes then remove the pan from heat.IMGP2318

Making the Monte Cristo

  • Heat a skillet on the stove at medium to high temperature, adding a liberal chunk of salted butter.
  • Dip the Sandwich whole into the batter, coating bottom and top slices of bread in egg.

    Yes, The Bread Goes Into Yolk!

    Yes, The Bread Goes Into Eggs!

  • When the skillet is hot and the butter is just beginning to brown, place the drenched sandwich into the skillet.

    Great Frying Cristo!

    Great Frying Cristo!

  • Fry each side for several minutes. Repeat for the remaining 2.
  • Remove sandwich from skillet and place on a middle rack in the oven for 5-7 minutes to get a nice crunchy and melty texture.

Serve the Monte Cristo as a Sandwich in two portions and dress the sides of the plate with the candied fig garnish. Don’t be a stranger to the figs; dip your Monte right into the sauce- it’s boss!

Fin!

Fin!