In the Style of Robert Burns: Ode to a Scottish Writer

In the Style of Robert Burns:

She’s as gone as dust, brotherRobert Burns Style, Draft April 2014
If ye’ bother, man,
You’ll find her favor,
A’ changin’ wi’ another, brother-
She’s as gone as dust, man.
Try nae gither ashes,
Nor rake em’,
Try nae tell ya, man,
It’s all burnt up,
Not a page remains, brother-
Put air in yer’ hand and close it,
Don’t peak,
I’ll tell ya’, man,
It’s not there
You never had it brother-
Take it frae a jilted lover,
tae try for ‘nother, man.

Robert Burns Portrait

Robert Burns Portrait

Robert Burns was a famed Scottish writer and poet who lived during the mid till late 18th century. He was noted for catching the sympathies and feelings of the nation through his colloquial Scottish brogue and emotionally connected prose that struck a chord with his fellow kin. His poetry is considered romantic and ranged in themes from historical, pastoral and ballad like. Many pieces included mournful odes to women and squandered fortune- but a balladeer he was.  Here is an excerpt from a favorite ballad named, Whistle which is a summons of famous figures to a heroic drinking contest:
Unmatch’d at the bottle,
unconquer’d in war,
He drank his poor god-ship as deep as the sea…
Roberts life was one marked for misfortune and poor health but through his brilliance of mind his writing lives on.

Thus all obscure, unknown, and poor, thro’ life I’m doom’d to wander, O, Till down my weary bones I lay in everlasting slumber, O: No view nor care, but shun whate’er might breed me pain or sorrow, O; I live to-day as well’s I may, regardless of to-morrow, O.
My Father was a Farmer, Robert Burns

Read, Whistle and others @ Burns Country

Watch this great BBC documentary on Robert Burns:

Advertisements

In the Style of Robert Burns: Ode to a Scottish Writer

In the Style of Robert Burns:

She’s as gone as dust, brotherRobert Burns Style, Draft April 2014
If ye’ bother, man,
You’ll find her favor,
A’ changin’ wi’ another, brother-
She’s as gone as dust, man.
Try nae gither ashes,
Nor rake em’,
Try nae tell ya, man,
It’s all burnt up,
Not a page remains, brother-
Put air in yer’ hand and close it,
Don’t peak,
I’ll tell ya’, man,
It’s not there
You never had it brother-
Take it frae a jilted lover,
tae try for ‘nother, man.

Robert Burns Portrait

Robert Burns Portrait

Robert Burns was a famed Scottish writer and poet who lived during the mid till late 18th century. He was noted for catching the sympathies and feelings of the nation through his colloquial Scottish brogue and emotionally connected prose that struck a chord with his fellow kin. His poetry is considered romantic and ranged in themes from historical, pastoral and ballad like. Many pieces included mournful odes to women and squandered fortune- but a balladeer he was.  Here is an excerpt from a favorite ballad named, Whistle which is a summons of famous figures to a heroic drinking contest:
Unmatch’d at the bottle,
unconquer’d in war,
He drank his poor god-ship as deep as the sea…
Roberts life was one marked for misfortune and poor health but through his brilliance of mind his writing lives on.

Thus all obscure, unknown, and poor, thro’ life I’m doom’d to wander, O, Till down my weary bones I lay in everlasting slumber, O: No view nor care, but shun whate’er might breed me pain or sorrow, O; I live to-day as well’s I may, regardless of to-morrow, O.
My Father was a Farmer, Robert Burns

Read, Whistle and others @ Burns Country

Watch this great BBC documentary on Robert Burns:

Schweinebraten with a Wine Gravy.

 Roast Pork with Wine Gravy: Bavarian style 

Simple and filling.

Simple and filling.

For the meat:

  • 600-800 gram piece of pork back or thigh with skin
  • Vegetable oil mix with salt, pepper and caraway seed
  • 1 ½ white onions
  • 3 cloves of garlic

Preheat oven to 175 c

  1. Cut onions and garlic keep peels and place around the center of the pan.
  2. Baste meat with mixed oil and spices and place in baking pan.
  3. place garlic and onions, on top, under and around meat for a good saturation of flavor. Drizzle the remaining oil mix over the onions, meat and pan.
  4. Place in the preheated oven. You will be cooking the meat for approximately 1 hour and 15 minutes. The onions and garlic will burn slightly, that is what is expected.

For the gravy*:

  • Dark wine like a Cab. Sauv.
  • White sugar
  • Tomato Puree
  • Packet of powdered, dark gravy mix for meat**
  • Splash of Orange Juice.
  • butter
  • whole milk

Prep:

  1. Pour about a tablespoon of white sugar with a bit water into a pot. Allow the water to boil out and the sugar to caramelize.
  2. Add one cup of wine and bring to a boil.
  3. Turn heat down and add a can of tomato puree; then a splash of orange juice.
  4. At low temperature you will let the mix reduce for about 40 minutes; Stirring every so often.
  5. After reduction, add 100 grams of butter, splash or two of milk to help round the flavor
  6. Add packet of brown gravy powder, stir.
  7. Let sit at low temperature for an additional 15-20 minutes.

Allow meat to cool for 10 minutes then serve with sauce drenching the meat. Garnish with parsely. Pairs well with a dark oatmeal beer, a lager, or a glass of heavy red wine. As a side you may wish to serve with roasted potatoes, potato salad, ora semmel knödel***

Rustic, simple, and a style of meat that is unmistakebly Bavarian

Rustic, simple, and a style of meat that is unmistakebly Bavarian

*This sauce is a variation of the beer rue.

**The packet I used is from Maggi and it is a schnitzel and mushroom based powdered gravy. Any dark brown powder gravy will work splendid. This is a quick sauce, if you wished, of course you can augment and create your own variations.

***The Semmel Knodel is a bread dumpling hailing from this area of Germany.

Domain de Fontavin: Muscat de Beaumes-de-Venise, vintage 96′

The color is beautiful and a muscat can be paired simply; here I pair it with an apple.

The color is beautiful and a muscat can be paired simply; here I pair it with an apple.

Yesterday, a colleague of mine presented a vintage bottle of Muscat to me. She held the bottle up to the light and said, by the coloration, and some vagary, that it was most likely spoiled and turned to vinegar. She was about to toss it and my heart twisted a bit and Well, as a gourmand, I told her, don’t throw it, give it  here. I’d be happy to find a suitable end for this bottle.  (And of which to share-for what is solitary pleasure when compared to one that can be relished and magnified by the company of friends and fellow gourmands?)

Well, lo and behold this sweet dessert wine was a hands-down winner.

I paired her with a simple Gala apple. The sweetness was intense but not so overpowering as found in some lesser Muscats. Personally, I don’t usually drink these sweet wines but this, mon ami, this was perfect. When one dipped a nose into the glass, swirled its ambered honey contents, one could pick out beautiful fruit flavored notes; Figs, apricots, raisins were all mixed in the aroma. If you were to sip the contents, rest its liquid onto the palette you’d find the same flavors that were picked up by the nose but this time, you taste a bit of pleasant heat from the alcohol and honey. I was talking to my partner in crime whilst tasting and he said that it certainly had some qualities akin to a sherry.

A delicate and surprising Muscat of good vintage.

A delicate and surprising Muscat of good vintage.